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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: This is a chest X-ray of a patient with symptomless right-sided tension pneumothorax, where the upper mediastinum (trachea) and lower mediastinum (heart) are shifted to the left side as shown in Figure 1. This phenomenon is unique; however, it does exist as in this patient, who came in a well-planned time to be checked up, 1 week after removal of a chest tube due to a right-sided pneumothorax. The patient was examined by the author after having the chest X-ray, and the patient denied any significant symptoms (no pain, no dyspnea, and normal respiration rate with stable vital signs). However, on examination, there was a slight tracheal shift to the left side which in turn is considered as a late sign in the course of tension pneumothorax development.

Figure 1: This is a chest X-ray of a patient with symptomless right-sided tension pneumothorax, where the upper mediastinum (trachea) and lower mediastinum (heart) are shifted to the left side as shown in Figure 1. This phenomenon is unique; however, it does exist as in this patient, who came in a well-planned time to be checked up, 1 week after removal of a chest tube due to a right-sided pneumothorax. The patient was examined by the author after having the chest X-ray, and the patient denied any significant symptoms (no pain, no dyspnea, and normal respiration rate with stable vital signs). However, on examination, there was a slight tracheal shift to the left side which in turn is considered as a late sign in the course of tension pneumothorax development.